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. >> right. a new report from brown university says the total cost of the war in iraq has been $2.2 trillion. the cost can double or triple when you take interest payments into account. why is it that your republican colleagues don't ever talk about this when they talk about our debt? they never mention this tremendous part of that debt. >> one thing that was so frustrating to a lot of democrats who consider ourselves to be fiscally responsible is of course, you had the bush tax cuts. then right after, you had the attacks on september 11th and you had the war on afghanistan, which i supported and almost all of the members of congress did, because those were the people that attacked us. but then, you had the war in iraq and both afghanistan and iraq were fought as quote emergencies, which means they weren't included in the annual deficits. so, now, when they're talking about a budget that cuts student loan programs for gi members, people coming back from iraq and afghanistan now they're not getting their student loans. because this was all fought off budget. i think that's political malpracti
stopped is black or brown. >> 80% of stop and frisk. >> more than that. something like 87%. not only that, even in the white neighborhoods, it is all minorities that are being stopped and frisked. there's no denying that this racial profiling going on here. and add to the pact that almost everybody who is being stopped, almost 700,000 in one year alone, almost everybody being stopped, has done absolutely nothing wrong. this is -- you know, this is not america. this is not democratic. >> confirmation after lot of this that we have been saying. this is perhaps a useful policing tool that's been misused and abused. that's occurred for years. so when you start to stop people based on purely what they look like and who they are, as you said, more than 9 on% of the people are black and hispanic. >> i think it is useful to be improve pd we need intensive training of a police officer of what the appropriate constitutional methodology is of stop and frisk. assign them to patrols and interact with the community. they will trust. thirdly, i think we need to regulate, tax and legalize marijuana so th
. chip saltzmann ran mike huckabee's campaign, and willie brown, of course, the -- chip, you're the republican. i think it comes down to juice, that sense of life, of protoplasm, of excitement, of -- it has many different meanings, but charisma, excitement. do these two guys represent the exciting candidates in your party? >> well, they do today. we always talk about does a candidate have the it factor. they certainly both have it right now. chris, as you well know, the path to the white house is long and windy. there's a lot of next presidents to the underbodies on the road. it's a long time between now and then. >> let's not be sheepish. do you sense right now they have the juice? >> absolutely. they both have great national names, they have organizations. they're going different paths. senator rubio is more the establishment route, and senator paul seems to be like he's going to take the antiestablishment creds all the way to the bank and will double down any chance he gets. >> youth, late 30s, early 40s, is that a big thing in the party? are you unlikely to bring in an ol
. a new report from brown university, the cost of war studty, proves just how wrong that early promise was. the cost in lives was of course overwhelm and far more than predicted. in total, 190,000 people lost their lives due to the war. 70% of them were iraqi civilians. that's 190,000 people dead. to give you an idea of the enormity of that number, enough people died in that war to fill yankee stadium. there it is. every seat of that stadium four times. and the cost of the iraq war was the other con job, the financial cost sold to the american people. the brown university study estimates the iraq war did eventually cost this country over $2 trillion. $2.2 trillion. hardly the price tag they were pushing in the beginning. michael hastings writes for "buzz feed" and covered the iraq war for "rolling stone" and wrote a book about it. "i lost my love if baghdad." a personal story. his latest story is "panic." paul rieckhoff, executive director and founder of the iraq and afghanistan veterans of america. from 2003 to 2004 he served as army first lieutenant in iraq. let me start with michael abo
before it was just too late. >>> and the fbi is joining the search for a missing brown university student. he hasn't been seen in more than a week. his cell phone, wallet and i.d. were all found in the apartment he shared with other students. >>> if you are up feeding your baby at this hour, you want to hear this. a new study says parents are feeding their babies solid food too early. 40% of parents surveyed fed their children solid food at 4 months. the american academy of pediatrics recommends that you wait until six months. early introduction of solid foods can increase your child's risk of obesity, diabetes and celiac disease. >>> earlierier we told you about the deal reached in cyprus to secure a bailout. so far it's having a positive impact on stocks around the globe. back here in the u.s., though, gasoline prices dropped 3 cents over the past two weeks according to the lundberg survey. billings, montana, has the lowest price and chicago has the highest at $4.10 a gallon. >>> the bid to take back dell and make it private again may backfire. competing bids from blackstone group and b
joins us later. campbell brown will be here and "the washington post" ezra klein. up next the top stories in the politico playbook. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >>> no good news and another snowstorm moving across the country. most likely sunday into monday. let me show you the stark contrast between this start of spring and last year. last year at this point the blue on the map and the purple show you where the snow was. no snow pretty much east of the ms river and through the midwest. only 20% of the country this time last year was covered in know. look at the map currently. 30% of the lower 48 covered by snow and we have snow pack from maine tlhrough the great lakes and upstate and wisconsin and minnesota. the winds coming down from canada over the snow, it just doesn't have a chance to moderate and warm up. look how cold it was yesterday. high temperatures in the 20s in the great lakes. we should be almost near mid-40s to near 50 this time of the year. this morning is very cold once again from fargo to minneapolis, chicago, just another bitterly cold day ou
. but the pope has chosen a more modest medium sized. average of an ordinary pastor or a church. with the brown and gold. he can see his investment is a simple investment. he wants to imstaitate st. fran. >> and we see the box which holding the fisherman's ring. it is used as a seal. in this case, it will not be solid gold. it is silver, it is plated in gold. another sign of a man who i think not only surprised us with his election, but someone whose every movement has suggested a different kind of papacy. >> i think it's definitely reflected what he thinks of himself. he realizes that as a bishop before and now as pope, he's just a servants of the people of god, and he expresses that in everything that he does. earlier this morning when he was driving through the crowd and greeting the faithful there, he actually stepped down from the popemobile and walked over to the side of the crowd where there was a handicapped man who had no arms and no legs and the pope leanedoff, blessed him, kissed him on the forehead. this is a pope who understands that his mission is to sefsht peop serve the people o
records on civil rights and over time, particularly with decisions like brown that were, of course, unanimous for many republicans eventually it became a permission structure. that's why the entire caucus starts voting for the voting rights act and other things. it's a checkered history so i don't mean to simplify it. but if the court goes federal here, i do think it would actually take some of this out of the political space, which could be good if you care about human rights. >> the a-team. alex wagner and ari melber, thank you both for joining me. >> thanks, lawrence. >>> coming up, tina fey's return to her alaskan roots and the man, the only man who could get her to go back. conservative. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. olay ultra moisture body wash can with more moisturizers than seven bottles of the
that have been ignored for years. in my case, it was a brown fill site where a lot of african-american families, 3 b300 families had been moved on to this site. it was a toxic dump. nobody had done anything about it. i started working hard -- >> you got government to fix it? >> i started working hard to get it relocated and once republicans and democrats in washington found out what happened, they worked on it and it was a pretty -- harold ford jr. the first time he met me on the floor what you're doing down in florida is land mark. what have you done and how did you get to it? i said i just went into the community. i didn't have to go vote for higher taxes or do these things that i was against idle lodeol y ideologically. >> what you did is called environmental justice. >> right. >> if you had gone to cpac and said words environmental justice, what sort of reception would you have gotten? it fi had gone to cpac and said you know what i did? i found 300 families that had been moved on top of a brown stone site, brown-filled site and their young children your reasoning around o
and not dark people or brown people from the south. how can you say you're basically for racialization of america, that whites should be welcome, but not other people. >> it's a mystery -- sorry. go ahead. >> i think what's the story is the evolution of cpac. it's so much the evolution of the republican party. it used to be a conference that attracted very, very conservative figures. now more and more you've seeing mainstream people i think that's very scary for republican parties, especially members and consultants who want to win again down the line. >>> here's sarah palin talking about something a bit you might say off-color, but it's her way of being funny and a bit of a redneck. >> you should have seen what todd got me. it wasn't that exciting, a metal rack, case for hunting rifle to put on the back of a four-wheeler, and then i had to get something for him to put in the gun case, right? so this go-around he's got the rifle. i got the rack. >> so that's how it's done, ron. liberals can't talk like that. conservativ conservatives, people on the wacko right can talk like that. i gue
effects ever. >>> the plan is this. win over black and brown voters. >> a landmark voting rights case, it comes down to the highest court. >> here's something you don't hear every day. the political gridlock gripping washington is not ruining the country. we'll have one of the foremost voices on the country saying we should cheer up. >> he's been called the son of nevada. that state's longest serving governor shares his jumpy from the streets of chicago to the bright lights of the mega strip. his latest gamble, agreeing to be in the guest spot. >> plus, i have a new book out. you're going to love it almost as much as you love "the cycle." >>> question for you. can better outreach to people of color save the gop? that's what the rnc is placing its bet on. rnc chair reince priebus rolled out the 200 plus recommendations of the so-called 2012 autopsy report. wait, autopsy? did they die? any way, what has the gop learned from its campaign failures? a weak message, terrible ground game and excluding the voters is not how you win elections. that steve core knacky is 1-1. they hope to revers
was thrown into sharp relief as brian brown, president of the national organization for marriage found himself voicing opposition to gay marriage in front of an empty room. memo to republicans and actually anyone on planet earth -- if you find yourself making an argument to a room full of empty chairs, it might be time to change your strategy. james, i want to go you first on this, given your storied past. a column in the "washington post" yesterday said clinton's announ announcements moves the ball significantly in confirming that no democratic presidential candidate will ever be viable, she's sending a strong member to the court is that americans are ready to embrace it. >> i think it's not unexpected. to say the least. and i do think it does send a signal, no one is going to run for the democratic nomination that doesn't embrace marriage equality. i would just point out that republicans do have some experience talking to empty chairs. so -- >> that is bad i totally missed the joke. >> all the republicans that signed the supreme court brief, do a little exercise and see how many of t
. and at least 134,000 iraqi civilians died in that conflict. the cost of war projected at brown university puts the current cost of the iraq war at $1.7 trillion. and estimates that total expenses will soar to $6 trillion over the next 40 years. now the lasting effect of the conflict and the misleading information that was used to justify it is still being felt today in washington. as our first read team points out, the iraq war is the most consequential political event of the past ten years, and probably beyond. joining me now, nbc news foreign correspondent. we have michael smerconish, military analyst general barry mccaffrey, and the first iraq war veteran to serve in congress. let's start with you here, general. as we look at what's happening at the moment, these attacks in shiite districts largely believed to be linked to suny militants, linked to al qaeda. what would you say the magazine any to do of the situation is? >> compared to the mayhem that was going on during the fighting for fallujah, it is relatively moderate. what we have going on in iraq now is the shia plurality, dominating
that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be like in 100 years. i don't get that. what do you think? >> when we think about what the typical american is, this is shown throughout social science literature. the typical american type is a white male, protestant, straight, married. right? so when we think about any departure from this type is considered the oth
decide to change the messaging on this. we saw paul brown now making some trouble saying that the paul ryan budget isn't conservative enough. he's running for the senate in georgia. if he's going to say that the ryan budget doesn't cut enough and starts pulling people off of even the ryan budget, well, you know, that is going to be some very, very tricky politics for the republican party and something the democrats will use against them in places that are competitive. >> now, tricky politics, republicans no question on the ryan budget and budgeting in general. tricky politics on guns for democrats. now, the assault weapons ban stripped out of the broader senate bill, harry reid has taken some flak for that. joe biden yesterday, the vice president of the united states who has taken a lead role on this, on npr talking about the assault weapons ban and whether or not it is doomed. let's play that and we'll talk about it. >> we are still pushing that it pass. the same thing was told to me when the first assault weapons ban in 'now was attached to the biden crime bill, that it couldn't poss
organization for marriage, brian brown, sass the grassroots of the party are 100% committed to protecting marriage and you can't just kick them to the curb. >> and according to faith and freedom coalition founder, raffle reed, if the republican party tries to retreat from being a pro marriage, pro family party, the big tent is going to become a pup tent very fast. >> will republican elders heed the warnings from social conservatives? at the rnc at least, the ship may have already sailed. as evidence, the rnc strategy document released this week, the so-called growth and opportunity project, did not once mention the words christian or church. joining us now to discuss the future of social conservatism and marriage equality, is the president of the human rights campaign, chad griffin. chad, it is a happy day to have you on this program. >> it is nice to be here, alex. >> chad, let's talk about what's going on inside the republican party. there's much change afoot. but specifically on the issue of gay marriage, is it your thinking that we're witnessing a sea change from conservatives, that t
that is against affirmative action gets so hot and boder if anyone brown or black or woman. in positions, and black conservatives really understand, i think, in a very real way that they have a great opening in a party like that. alan west became an instant star. mr. herman cain became an instant star. at one point he was at the top of the list of people when you polled republicans. there's still people who want allan west to be president. ben carson has an added benefit. he hasn't been caught up in the republican party bad brand problems. a lot of people didn't even know he was a conservative. he also has a book to sell. he's going to sell a lot. >> you're being far to ironic and cynical. david, is it not possible that an individual like dr. ben carson could well, i don't know, become a potential presidential nominee? herman cain was in the running at one point. >> yes, i mean, herman cain makes him look like linking in a lot of ways in terms of political experience as well. he has a few, you know, down sides already. he's already said that he's opposed to medicare and medicaid. he'd li
's an equal right. it struck down equal in the brown v. board case. we don't want separate, but equal. we just want equal, nothing more, nothing less. >> victoria, this week we had senator portman talking about changing his position in effect because a member of his family came out and that affected his view. is this, in a sense, a demographic movement that however much people may oppose is literally like a wave that will eventually sweep over? >> martin, earlier this week the pugh center came out with a poll showing that a third of people who are now in favor of gay marriage change their position. so they had previously been against it and now they're for it and what happens is when you get to know somebody on a personal level the stereo typical contexts start to fade away and you start to look at that person as who they are and you don't look at the stigma attacked to their group. rob portman, classic case and it's a textbook case of intergroup contact theory where the more contact you have, not just by saying i know somebody, i know the cousin of a friend or my gardener or my busboy is this
. and most of them were in the black and brown commune pipts talking about access to books and the likes and access to computers and classroom sizes. i think we are paying for a misappropriatation on the war and tax cut. and schools struggle in chicago, detroit, on democracy, we are paying a big price for the misstep in iraq and afghanistan. >> yes, sir. dying today, at 82 years old, rest if peace, wrote a book, harkening back to william yates. is there still a chance the closings can be forstalled. >> first of all, this is an experiment. the hear shines, 54 schools, kids going across gang zones, we have lost last year nearly 600 of our youth were killed, whether high profile can killings within a fear of run across not known as gang zones. without urban policy that's defined, of drugs, guns, jobs end, home foreclosures. that is the devaluation after school tax base evaluation. the school, job, poverty, racial violence and fear. >> reverend jackson, is what is happening in chicago indicative of where we are setting priorities across the country? they seem to be awfully misled and don't s
in unanimous decisions like brown, in school busing, obviously in a lot of areas of extending rights to minorities. they were way ahead of both parties. you go back to the original civil rights raer and both parties were table because we lived in a completely racist, elite structure. and so the court was really one of the only elite institutions in the country that ran against that. while i understand the broader context, i think this is a supreme court that by that historical standard is late and that has fell behind as recently as the '80. this was a supreme court that was upholding states' ability to put people in jail for having gay sex. in 1986. not a long time ago. so they're late, they're behind and i think there will be a tremendous desire to find a ruling. maybe not 100% federalized ruling but to find a ruling that really cracks the door a lot more open toward these rights. >> you're right. the court is late on this. and i'm not comfortable with proposing this sort of state by state approach that jonathan is suggesting. because i think civil rights should not be decided by v
ferguson and the next brown versus board of education. he wants to be on the right side of history. what's your response to that in. >> all of that is quite accurate except maybe where they're guessing about kennedy's mind and the right side of history. but that also sounds right to me. he did rule, he is going to be probably the deciding vote with the other justices evenly split. so which way he throws his weight will be determinative. he did decide in favor of gay rights in two previous cases. somewhat different but also somewhat the same as this. so we'll just have to wait and see about that. >> liz, i want your reaction to the fact that justice roberts' cousin who is gay jean podrasky will be in the audience. she believes that he sees the tide and that she trusts his judgment absolutely. that he will go, in the quote, good direction. that's an incredible development to have his relative. we've seen recently obviously, politicians come out because their children say they are gay and they want to support their child as well as laws that could benefit their children. is not that an inte
would be stopping the pipeline of young, you know, black and brown males directly into the penal system out of middle school. and, you know, i think that's probably a really good start in terms of, you know, making some reasonable impact on our, you know, overcriminalization, overincarceration of young men. i don't know, however, that it would galvanize or bring any more of those young men to his fold given his other stances. as angela said, records do matter and hand paul has quite an extensive one. >> i'm thinking there might be some voters who would give the republican party a second look on that one. hogan, so speaking of your party, and the loss last year, mitt romney, he's announced that he's going to hold a summit for business and political leaders this summer in park city, utah. his former running mate, paul ryan, and chris christie, will also be there. so is this romney trying to be the king maker? >> that's a great question, too. i don't know. i can't see it happen even if he wanted to be. could you imagine the first nominee we put forth would be made the nominee by a mitt rom
votes. >> i know what they're doing. they know what they're doing. anybody of any color, white or brown or black ought to notice what it's about. it's about race. >> they don't understand, if they go in that direction, they're driving themselves further -- >> the whole message to minorities, we're trying to disenfranchise you. come up with a new literacy text -- >> they'll stick with rural areas where no people are. >> thank you, guys. thank you, howard. you're all right. thank you, joy. he's more vintage like me. you through sheer genius. it's caught up with us. >>> up next, first the truth, then the brave. how the people who were supposed to be the referees in the war going up to the war became its cheerleaders on the way. we'll be right back. we're talking iraq and how it happened. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. our financial advice is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. life brings obstacles. usaa brings retirement advice. i work for 47 different companies. well, technicall
achievement. you get brown v board but you don't necessarily get desegregated schools. >> quite the opposite. >> right. the focus on the legal right, while totally understandable because equal rights under the law seems like a basic starting point for any kind of egalitarian politics. it's a piece. one of the things -- i think that the analogy made to abortion is quite instructive. the energy with ruth bader ginsburg this morning. one of the problems with the way abortion has evolved as an issue was that it was disarticulated from broader reproductive justice issues. so that abortion sort of became like a consumer right that an individual could purchase approximate she could afford it. >> yep. >> other people would lose the right because it wasn't understood as a matter of justice. it was understood as a kind of consumer right. with marriage, the same danger is there. that the legal right to access to marriage as it now exists is kind of the end point. even though we won't get there now, we'll get there eventually. rather than understanding that a broader way of recognizing household and par
constitutionally has to have some reason to be able to do this. and stopping folks because they're black and brown does not pass constitutional muster at all. talk to me about what that be constantly frisked is disheartening. these people are living every day lives and are stopped. the law enforcement who works for the city. it's absurd. and i shouldn't have to worry what a cop is thinking or wonder just because i'm walking outside at night that i'm more likely to be stopped. that shouldn't exist. >> this idea, councilman is part of -- i feel like it's the difference of the experience of being a black american. when you see the police car, you get a sense of anxiety, and not a sense of protect and serve. >> i parentally it doesn't stop. i was arrested trying to get into event. the officer either didn't believe who we were or didn't care. it's also frustrating to me that it seems like things in the 1960s. we're trying to tell people why it's wrong to do things in the community. it's amazing we need this discussion. when it comes to larm and stopping crime, the answer has always been stop as many as
what it means. literally no one knows what it means. you call people up, back brown checks that makes common sense. they put down their phone and go about their day and do they ever think about it again? maybe, maybe not. do they call their congressman, write a check, show up at a town hall. when we talk about where the public is, you know, it's this incredibly mysterious thing that ends up occupying the center of every conversation we have. >> it doesn't measure depth. >> i totally agree on the gun issue. >> with guns there's a majority in favor of -- >> background checks. >> background checks. but it's whether you can mobilize that majority and actually really gun advocates are far more likely to write a letter, far more likely to lobby and far more militant. one of the differences between this and immigration reform immigration reform as a ready made mobilized community behind it. they are trying to actually create a community around guns. >> i want to read this quote because this is a politico report on a deal the white house made with groups that are advocating gun safety legisl
'm a ron brown democrat, and i remember when he told me, when the democrats are in the wilderness, it's never as good as you think and it's never at bad. the republican party can rally around and bring minorities and women to the table, but it's about actions and deeds. when you have people out there doing the type of things that, for example, the leader, mcconnell, was doing or some of the leadership in the house of representatives, it's not about words. those words, those 97 pages, that must have been the abridged version. it must be a much longer dissertation to understand really what their problems is. but at the end of the day, it's about actions and deeds. i believe my republican brother and i have a lot of great friends on the republican party. i believe they can turn it around. but it gets down to, craig, actions and deeds. when you show great actions and you do great deeds, people will rally around you. >> i thought you were about to say -- >> i want your friends too. >> i thought he was about to say, i have republicans over to my house all the time. >> they always come over
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)